Science Fair Journal

 

Science Fair Project

Introduction

 

My science fair project presents the poverty in Vancouver. I chose this subject because it’s been a trend from 2005 and has been growing ever since. As a person that gets to go home with a roof over her head it hurts me to think that 3,605 people in Metro Vancouver don’t. The BC poverty rate is the worst out of Canada. Too many people are struggling to feed themselves, family, or a loved one. Even earn a living wage, or find affordable housing. According to Rent Jungle the average rent for a one bedroom apartment in Vancouver is $1500 a month. Thats 18,000 a year, if an average person work 20 hours a week on a minimum wage ($12.65 an hr) that would be $253 per week but for a month it would be $1,012 not even meeting the average months rent and they also have to pay for food and extra bills ext… Vancouver is such an expensive place to live in no wonder why there’s so many homeless people.

 

Hypothesis

My question is how is the government going to reduce the homeless rate in vancouver and how can we help. To help me answer this question I contacted Shane Simpson

Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction A Vancouver Police officer and the people of Downtown Vancouver. I will be making a short documentary video with my interviews with the police officer and the people of Downtown.I’m hoping to learn more about government and what’s going on in the world and where I live. how it feels to live in poverty. How to build a film (documentary) learn how to edit a video. HOw to ask questions as a reporter/poverty activist.

 

Materials

  • Camera
  • Microphone
  • Internet
  • Computer

 

 

 

Methods

 

People I contacted:

United Church homeless shelter – 320 East Hastings St, Vancouver – 604-839-6880


Shane Simpson Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction – SDPR.Minister@gov.bc.ca

 

Celina’s dad ( Vancouver Police officer)

 

 

 

Email to United Church:

 

Dear First United Church,

my name is Rahma Lossing I attend at Terry Fox Secondary, Port Coquitlam, B.C. I have a science project on solving world problems. I chose to create a video about poverty. I feel like it would move the person watching and motivate them and make them aware of this problem, and what its like to be in these situations. I would like to interview one of your staff for my video. Here are the questions that I would like to ask you

  1. How would you describe the working pace at your shelter?
  2. What is the working environment and culture like at your shelter?
  3. What’s the hardest time of the year for the shelter?
  4. Is this a religion based program ?
  5. How is this shelter being funded?
  6. How long does it normally take for a person taken in by your shelter to get housing?
  7. Do you take people that are on probation or petrol?
  8. What are the rules about using drugs or drinking on the premises?
  9. Do you do drug tests?
  10. Do they have to be a canadian citizen to receive housing.

Kind Regards,

Rahma

 

 

Email to Shane Simpson:

 

Dear Shane Simpson,

my name is Rahma Lossing I attend at Terry Fox Secondary, Port Coquitlam, B.C. I have a science project on solving world problems. I chose to create a video about poverty. I feel like it would move the person watching and motivate them to precipitate in helping to solve the problem. On the Vancouver Sun website it clams that you know how to help poverty in B.C. I would love to hear how your going to moving this plan forward and your ideas on a phone interview for my project. I would ask you these following questions;

  1. What is your plan to fix poverty?
  1. How much will it cost to reduce poverty in B.C., the only province in Canada without an official poverty reduction plan?
  1. How long do you think it will take to fix poverty with your new plan?
  1. What is your party’s plan for food security in this province?
  1. Does your party have a plan for meeting the health care needs of those who do not have access to medical services not now provided by the province?
  1. Does your party have a plan for supporting affordable and accessible public transportation in rural communities?

Kind Regards,

Rahma

 

 

 

 

Email to Vancouver Police Department:

 

Dear Vancouver Police Department (VPD),

 

My name is Rahma Lossing. I attend school at Terry Fox Secondary, Port Coquitlam, B.C. I have a science project focused on solving world problems. I chose to create a video about poverty. I feel like it would move the person watching, motivating them to be aware of this problem, and what its like to be in poverty. I would like to interview one of your officers for my video. Here are the questions that I would like to ask during the interview:

 

  • Do you deal with people on the streets?
  • How do you think poverty can be reduced?
  • What are the most common situations you deal with, with the homeless?
  • What are your thoughts on safe injection sites?
  • How do you think children that are raised in poverty can grow and get out of that situation?
  • Where do you think poverty is so prevalent in the VPD jurisdictional area

 

Kind Regards,

Rahma

 

 

The Responses I Got: 

Mr.Teleko was willing to be interviewed. But after I went out to downtown Vancouver, interviewed people on the streets and got all the footage I needed.

 

Response from United Church:

 

Hi Rahma,

Thanks for reaching out, but our staff here at First United are extremely busy supporting our clients and we don’t normally do interviews. I would encourage you to explore all the excellent resources and research that has already been done on poverty and in our neighbourhood. Perhaps you could interview some folks you know about their opinions and beliefs about poverty and compare them to what you find in the research?


Best of luck with your project.



Kristine Lawson

Resource Development & Communications Coordinator

 

Response from Shane Simpson:

 

Rahma Lossing

Student

Terry Fox Secondary School

Dear Rahma:

Thank you for your email of November 19, 2018, regarding your science project on poverty in British Columbia. I am pleased to respond and I apologize for the delay in doing so.

I’m very impressed with your concern and compassion for people living in poverty. I agree that a video may help people to understand that the impacts of poverty and inequality are far-reaching and touch on many areas of people’s lives, including housing, food security, health, and transportation, among others. In turn, this understanding will hopefully motivate people to consider how they may help those living in poverty and adopt a more inclusive community spirit.

Although, regrettably, my schedule does not permit me to meet with you at this time, I’d like to provide you with information for your project.

You asked about the government’s poverty reduction plan. On November 5, 2018, the legislature unanimously passed the Poverty Reduction Strategy Act. This legislation commits government to developing a poverty reduction plan by March 31, 2019.

The legislation commits government to reducing the poverty rate by 25 percent for all persons living in poverty and 50 percent for children by 2024. The targets are based on the 2016 Market Basket Measure, which was recently adopted by the federal government as Canada’s official poverty line. The result of achieving these targets (based on 2016 numbers) will be approximately 140,000 fewer people living in poverty, including 50,000 kids.

You can read about this historic legislation at https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2018SDPR0051-001912.

You also asked about food security, meeting people’s health care needs, and public transportation in rural and remote communities in BC.  These were key issues raised during the poverty reduction engagement process that concluded at the end of March 2018.

People spoke about the importance of healthy, nutritious food and how, as other bills rise, they have less money to pay for food. Some ways we are working to increase financial security for families is by increasing the minimum wage to $15.20 by 2021. We also increased income and disability assistance rates by $100 a month, a move that benefits 190,000 people in the province. Further, the Crisis Food Supplement for people on assistance has been doubled to $40 per month for people who need additional support due to an emergency.

In response to your question about how we are helping people access medical services, Medical Services Plan premiums were cut in half this year and will be eliminated as of January 1, 2020, saving families up to $1800 per year. We also made investments to reduce waitlists, improve care for seniors, and eliminate prescription drug deductibles for families with annual net incomes below $30,000.

Your question about public transportation in rural and remote communities was also an issue raised during the poverty reduction engagement process. Safe, affordable transportation was seen as a key link to enable people to get out into communities and to jobs. In rural and remote communities, people spoke about how limited public transportation options made it harder for them to access the services they need. In response, the BC government launched BC Bus North earlier this year to cover many of the northern routes that the Greyhound Bus Company eliminated. Details and costs of new provincial investments to reduce poverty are expected in the government’s 2019 Budget.

The issues you raised, along with many others raised by British Columbians, are being carefully considered in BC’s work going forward, including in the development of the poverty reduction plan. I would encourage you to review the summary of feedback we received during our poverty reduction engagement process, which is available online athttps://engage.gov.bc.ca/bcpovertyreduction/read-public-and-stakeholder-input/.

The poverty reduction plan will be built on the guiding principles of affordability, opportunity, social inclusion, and reconciliation. It will seek to improve people’s lives by addressing both the breadth and depth of poverty and will have a focus on breaking the cycle of poverty. It is important to understand as well that this is a cross-ministry commitment, and the plan will outline a comprehensive government-wide approach to poverty reduction that draws in a wide range of ministries.

Thank you again for taking the time to enquire about our government’s poverty reduction plan. I wish you all the best with your video project and school year. I appreciate hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Shane Simpson

Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction

 

 Out come with Vancouver Police Department:

 

I will be interviewing a police officer on friday january 10. Asking the following questions:

 

  • Do you deal with people on the streets?
  • How do you think poverty can be reduced?
  • What are the most common situations you deal with, with the homeless?
  • What are your thoughts on safe injection sites?
  • How do you think children that are raised in poverty can grow and get out of that situation?
  • Where do you think poverty is so prevalent in the VPD jurisdictional area

 

Rahma Lossing

Science 9

Block B

January 9 2019                                                 

Poverty Report

Doing this science fair project i learned a lot more talked with the community of Vancouver than I did online. I was having this amazing conversation with a tent camper about the life of being homeless and its a lot harder than I thought. Did you  know that every morning in downtown Vancouver they power wash the streets so if your sleeping on the street over night and you don’t  wake up in time your going to get power hosed and you’ll be dealing with the police.  Once you go homeless its really hard going back. If you try and rent a apartment you need to put a fixed address of  but if you don’t live anywhere you don’t have a reference witch makes your chance of getting a roof over your head a lot harder. The only other option is to stay at the cheap hotels in Vancouver. They look horrifying on the outside and inside. You could stay there for 6 months and use that as your fixed address. “Its safer to live outside than in those hotels because most places you don’t have a door but if you have one it doesn’t lock, its full of prostitution and drugs, and then its infested with cockroaches and everything else.”- tent camper. A lot of homeless people experience frost bite on there feet witch usually comes from them sitting outside for a long time. You might see some homeless with a limp or with a cane its usually because they have frost bite.